Posts Tagged ‘Louisiana’

Natchitoches, Louisiana

Posted by Bob Hoelscher in The South on February 28, 2013

 
 

One of the most interesting cities I encountered during my December tour of the South was Natchitoches (pronounced NACK-a-tish), located in western Louisiana.  Guiding my two-day visit here was Markita Hamilton, communications director for the Natchitoches Area Convention & Visitors Bureau, whose family has lived here for generations. This charming community, the first permanent European…

 
 

Although one might associate many national parks with the arrival of icy roads and mountain snows in December, there are many Southern parks that are still suitable for a late-year group visit. Just south of Natchitoches, Louisiana, is Cane River Creole National Historical Park, which protects two great cotton plantations: Magnolia and Oakland. In 1753,…

 
 

Play hard?  No problems there.  Especially in a city that was getting its groove on at its annual Red River Revel festival, one of Louisiana’s biggest and baddest music and arts events.  The entire delegation was taken to the festival, treated to all they could enjoy in the way of regional foods and beverages and…

 
 

There were two distinct sides to the first Small Market Meetings Conference held October 4-6 in sunny Shreveport, Louisiana.  The first was all business, the second was all fun.  The meeting planners who attended from 18 states did a superb job of accommodating both. ‘Work hard, play hard.  That’s what we tell them,’ said conference…

 

Behind the antebellum glamour

Posted by Eliza Myers in The South on August 04, 2010

 
 

When I started my day touring the Nottoway Plantation, I thought that this was the life. The 1859 white plantation is the largest remaining antebellum mansion in the South. I felt blown away by the size of it all with 14-foot-high ceilings that seemed to indicate the house was built for giants. An elaborate bell…

 

Eccentric buildings and characters

Posted by Eliza Myers in The South on August 03, 2010

 
 

Immediately upon driving into Baton Rouge, the tall tower created by former governor Huey Long rose above the surrounding buildings. The 1932 art deco state capitol building certainly stands out in the city’s skyline as the infamous Long intended. After I toured the Old State Capitol built in 1847, I found it hard to image…